Muslims Celebrate Eid al-Adha

A Nigeria Muslim wpman and friends takes a selfie photo after Eid al-Adha, or Feast of Sacrifice, that commemorates the Prophet Ibrahim's faith, at the prayer ground in Lagos, Nigeria, Monday, Sept. 12, 2016. Eid al-Adha marks the end of hajj. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
A Nigeria Muslim woman and friends take a selfie photo after Eid al-Adha, or Feast of Sacrifice, that commemorates the Prophet Ibrahim’s faith, at the prayer ground in Lagos, Nigeria, Monday, Sept. 12, 2016. Eid al-Adha marks the end of hajj. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)

Muslim faithfuls across the world and in Nigeria will be making merry as they celebrate the feast of Eid al-Adha, popularly known as Eid El Kabir today (Monday).

Eid al-Adha, which simply means “Feast of the Sacrifice,” referring to the willingness of Ibrahim to sacrifice Ishmael on Mount Moriah, according to Islāmic tradition, begins with a sunnah prayer of two rakats followed by a sermon (khutbah). Eid al-Adha celebrations start after the descent of the Hujjaj, the pilgrims performing the Hajj, from Mount Arafat, a hill east of Mecca.

It is one of the remarkable periods of the Islāmic calendar where Muslims slaughter animals (ram or cow) and divide major parts of the meat and give it to the poor. Families that do not own livestock can make a contribution to a charity that will provide meat to those who are in need.

Despite the economic situation, Muslims in Nigeria appear unfazed as they believe it’s an obligation and a practice that must be observed. Monday and Tuesday has been declared as public holiday to mark the feast of Eid El Kabir by the federal government.